Archive for the ‘Leadership’ Category

In 100 Words: Double Dips are Hard

Wednesday, September 15th, 2021 by Troy Schrock

Double dip: a second recurrence of some bad event or trial outside our control in short succession to the first – e.g., economic recession, market downturn, disease, or viral pandemic. These situations are hard on people physically and psychologically so people can become discouraged. They recently experienced the excitement of getting through the difficulty, then WHAM, the double dip – they are right back in hard times.

Leaders should acknowledge the difficulty of reverting to tighter restrictions and more limited resources. More importantly, leaders should keep people encouraged – acknowledge their efforts, share in the extra work, and provide hope for the future.

“Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;” William Shakespeare in King Henry V

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In 100 Words: Benefits of Pruning

Friday, July 30th, 2021 by Troy Schrock

Plants perform better with pruning. Proper pruning:

• Improves health and vigor.
• Maintains good shape and structure.
• Focuses the plant’s resources on its best aspects.

Similarly, proper “pruning” in organizations strengthens the whole. Don’t continue adding new and more without figuring out what should be eliminated and reduced. This is how organizations become over-grown.

Consider what activities and costs are no longer producing the desired value. Use segmentation analysis to determine which products, services or customers are no longer a value-fit. Thin down your list of opportunities and potential investments to those which require the organization’s best, limited resources to flourish.

“There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.” Peter F. Drucker

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In 100 Words: Capability Multipliers

Tuesday, June 15th, 2021 by Troy Schrock

Five capability multipliers are listed below. Each factor will expand a person’s contribution regardless of the individual’s base level of talent, skill or knowledge.

1. Attitude – positive and pleasant with a desire to openly engage and serve people.

2. Energy – a result of physical and mental conditioning through diet, rest and exercise.

3. Focus – concentrated attention and effort toward the task or situation at hand.

4. Strengths – leverage unique strengths within the particular work.

5. Teachability – willing to absorb and apply both new knowledge and instructive feedback.

Managing these five well amplifies existing capabilities. How do these resonate with you?

“When you can do the common things of life in an uncommon way, you will command the attention of the world.” George Washington Carver

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In 100 Words: Don’t Confuse Size with Impact

Friday, April 30th, 2021 by Troy Schrock

Isn’t it refreshing talking with leaders who are excited to share stories and measures of impact rather than telling you how big an organization they lead? It’s refreshing because the default measures of success are generally revenue volume, market valuation, and number of employees. Does significance come only from having a larger organization?

Imagine you and your team thinking through how to measure and communicate impact along with units of size. Maybe identify measures around:

• Your purpose (cause)
• Impact made in your customer’s and employee’s lives
• Your community investment

The focus shifts our thinking to how we can multiply impact.

“You can have an impact anywhere you are.” Tony Dungy

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In 100 Words: You Don’t Have to Create Perfect

Tuesday, March 16th, 2021 by Troy Schrock

Creative work is important for leaders. This encompasses everything from innovating new offerings and business models to crafting a new process or marketing campaign. There is pressure with this work to “get it right” the first time. However, final-form solutions are rarely the result of the first draft. Innovation involves drafting and re-drafting. This is a tough reality. The pride of authorship may also lead to defensiveness toward feedback.

It can be liberating to know we don’t have to create perfect. Soliciting challenging input earlier typically yields a stronger solution while saving time, energy and money.

Create working solutions and iterate.

“The essential part of creativity is not being afraid to fail.” Edwin H Land

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In 100 Words: When to Say No to Good Opportunities

Friday, January 1st, 2021 by Troy Schrock

Most organizations rarely experience a shortage of good opportunities. What is not rare, though, is a shortage of attention span, time, and resources. Despite these limitations, leaders hesitate to keep resources focused on developing the opportunities already in process and say NO to new opportunities.

We get excited and over-value potential returns of the new opportunities. This reveals the flip-side – we under-value the harvest to be gained by bringing our current BEST opportunity to fruition. Fully invest in the opportunity selected as BEST for now until it is mature. Once it is harvested, plenty of new opportunities will be waiting.

“The art of leadership is saying no, not saying yes. It is very easy to say yes.” Tony Blair

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