Posts Tagged ‘Self Management’

In 100 Words: Savoring Quiet

Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 by Troy Schrock

Reflection time is a luxury many people find too expensive. Consequently, the skill of quiet thinking can be under-developed. We live in 24/7, visual-rich, noise-saturated, media-stimulated environments. Who dares unplug and go quiet? What might we miss?

Physiologically, our minds don’t function well “always on.” Reflection time is where our minds work subconsciously connecting stored dots of information.

Practice quiet.

• Turn off devices
• Sit or stroll outside – nature is conducive to mental meandering
• Close your eyes – other senses awaken

When we are thirsty we gulp. To savor a drink, we sip and swish. Reflection is savoring quiet.

“The monotony and solitude of a quiet life stimulates the creative mind.” Albert Einstein

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In 100 Words: Position Well

Wednesday, January 31st, 2018 by Troy Schrock

Where do you produce your greatest value and are you positioned to do so? Do you know what activities lead to your best work? Do you orient your time accordingly? If not, start a time log.

Identifying what keeps us out of position is a good first step toward contributing our best. Many of us don’t properly structure our work activities. Maybe we haven’t given thought to which activities yield the highest returns. Possibly we hold onto work that should be delegated or stopped altogether. Then, there are those pesky distractions.

Evaluate how you can reposition to deliver higher value.

“There’s an awful temptation to just keep on researching. There comes a point where you just have to stop, and start writing.” David McCullough

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In 100 Words: Being Present

Monday, August 1st, 2016 by Troy Schrock

How well do you concentrate your mental and emotional faculties on the situation at hand? Can you tell when someone else in a conversation is “miles away?” Here are four reasons why being present is a difficult skill to do well in our person-to-person interactions:

• we are naturally self vs. others focused
• we allow distractions (phones, email, etc.)
• we aren’t emotionally invested
• our minds wander

If we cultivate the mindset of being present we will have greater impact in the current situation. More importantly, we send people the message that they, and the tasks at hand, are important.

“The mind is never satisfied with the objects immediately before it, but is always breaking away from the present moment…” Samuel Johnson

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In 100 Words: The Snare of Easy Success

Saturday, October 31st, 2015 by Troy Schrock

In any endeavor – academics, athletics, career or business – performing at the top is exhilarating! However, if success comes too quickly and easily, a deceptive snare is laid – blindness to the need to improve. The motivation to form healthy work and learning habits is missing. It’s simply a matter of time until performance peaks out.

Remaining a top performer – sustaining success over time – requires continuous growth and work. Life is a progression, not a single event. The factors influencing achievement are constantly shifting, so only deliberate improvement prepares us for more challenging future pursuits and enables us to elude the snare.

“Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning.” Benjamin Franklin

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In 100 Words: Cultivating Thankfulness

Friday, December 13th, 2013 by Troy Schrock

It is natural to be thankful this time of year.  I believe we have greater joy in life when we live in active gratitude.  Appreciation enriches all of our experiences and relationships.  Can we consciously nurture grateful attitudes all year?  I believe so.  I think attitude follows right actions.  Here are several actions which help me cultivate thankfulness:

  •  Serving others who need help.
  • Writing daily or weekly “thankful lists.”
  • Commending others for good things they are doing.
  • Spending time outside – in awe of something larger than myself.
  • Reading inspirational literature (primarily the Bible for me).

How do you cultivate thankfulness?

“Keep your eyes open to your mercies. The man who forgets to be thankful has fallen asleep in life.”  (Robert Louis Stevenson)

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In 100 Words: Too Satisfied?

Friday, September 13th, 2013 by Troy Schrock

We extol the virtues of satisfaction, and rightly so.  Satisfied employees and customers are key to our organization’s success.  Is there such a thing as being too satisfied?  Yes, in ourselves, and our organizations, it is known as complacency.  Ouch!

We like to be comfortable.  It’s not easy to push ourselves to keep learning, growing and improving.  Dissatisfaction seems to have a negative connotation, yet it can be highly productive – exciting people to right injustices or simply improve situations that are less than great.

Where have you become too satisfied and comfortable in your own life, work, habits and thinking?

“Don’t let your special character and values, the secret that you know and no one else does, the truth – don’t let that get swallowed up by the great chewing complacency.”      (Aesop)

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