Archive for 2013

In 100 Words: Repeat Yourself

Friday, March 15th, 2013 by Troy Schrock

I often recite Samuel Johnson’s quote: “Men more frequently require to be reminded than informed.”

CEOs and executive teams generally have a good idea of sound business fundamentals.  Very little “new” knowledge is new at all.  However, good principles and disciplines still get lost in the shuffle of daily executive decisions and routines.

Do not be afraid to repeat yourself or to have your team reread certain material.  Part of your job is to repeat yourself on a regular basis.  If what you are saying is important for the future of your organization, you can’t say it enough.

Remind on!

“Repetition is the mother of learning.” (Thomas Acquinas)

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In 100 Words: The Influence of Peter Drucker

Friday, February 1st, 2013 by Troy Schrock

Amidst the plethora of new business writing published each year, it’s easy to lose sight of Peter Drucker’s significant influence.  Jim Collins said in a May 2006 speech that Drucker had a formative influence on every company he and Jerry Porras profiled in Built to Last.  In the introduction to his book, Go Put Your Strengths to Work, Marcus Buckingham notes that many people trace the “strengths movement” back to Drucker, who for years encouraged both individuals and organizations to focus on areas of strength.

Business advisors benefit greatly from a liberal sprinkling of Drucker’s writing in their reading regimen.

“I regard it as a compliment when some people call me the Father of Marketing.  I tell them that if this is the case, then Peter Drucker is the Grandfather of Marketing.”  (Philip Kotler)

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The Importance of Peter F. Drucker

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013 by Troy Schrock

Amidst the plethora of new business writing published each year, it’s easy to lose sight of Peter Drucker’s significant influence.  Known as the “father of modern management,” his writing provides the central themes of much of the current management, marketing, and general business writing.

Marketing guru Philip Kotler states, “…I regard it as a compliment when some people call me the Father of Marketing.  I tell them that if this is the case, then Peter Drucker is the Grandfather of Marketing.”  Jim Collins said at a dinner speech in May 2006 that Drucker had a formative influence on every company he and Jerry Porras profiled in Built to Last.  In the introduction to his most recent book, Go Put Your Strengths to Work, strengths guru Marcus Buckingham notes that many people trace the “strengths movement” back to Drucker, who for years encouraged both individuals and organizations to focus on areas of strength.

Business advisors benefit greatly from a liberal sprinkling of Drucker’s writing in their reading regimen.

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